Cricket Australia wants ball tampering fiasco done and dusted

EVEN David Warner admitted there was a mountain of questions remaining in Australia’s ball tampering fiasco, but now we may never know the answers.-Sabrang

THE Australian public may never find out precisely what happened on the fateful afternoon in Cape Town that shook cricket to its core — at least not from Cricket Australia (CA).

Despite all three players involved choosing not to appeal their punishments — signalling the end of the official process led by CA into the ball-tampering scandal — chairman David Peever said the governing body would release no further details or confirmation about what actually occurred.

Even disgraced opener David Warner admitted there were “unanswered questions and lots of them” regarding the lunch break on day three of the Newlands Test, when he showed Cameron Bancroft how to rough up a ball using sandpaper. Warner didn’t respond to them at his press conference last Saturday — much to the frustration of cricket lovers who were hoping for closure, or at least a more specific breakdown of events.

Instead, fans may have to wait for the inevitable tell-all interviews or books that are begging to be written about the incident to fill in the gaps, because Peever wants to leave it all in the past.

“The integrity review made its findings, made its recommendations, sanctions were offered, have been accepted,” Peever told reporters in Brisbane on Friday. “There’s been a lot (of detail released) in terms of the advice that was provided from the investigation itself.

“I don’t anticipate there will be more release of information. “We’re moving forward from here. The announcement of the review today is all about moving forward.” Who came up with the plan, why they resorted to it, who provided the sandpaper, and whether it was the first time it had been done by an Australian cricket team are questions that will remain unresolved for the time being. However, Peever said “the door has been left open” for Steve Smith to potentially captain the country again in the future.

“Steve, nevertheless, has a long road back and we at Cricket Australia, the (states) and the ACA will be working well to make sure that we wrap the structures around these young men to make sure that they are able to rebuild their career,” he said.

“But it’s a long journey. Their lives have been turned upside down. I wouldn’t speculate about any of that.”

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